US elections: Joe Biden appoints Indian-American Medha Raj his digital chief of staff



United States presidential candidate Joe Biden has tapped Indian-American Medha Raj to be his digital chief of staff, reported PTI on Tuesday.

Raj, in a LinkedIn post on June 26, said: “Excited to share that I’ve joined Joe Biden’s campaign as the Digital Chief of Staff. One hundred and thirty days to the election and we’re not going to waste a minute!”

The US presidential campaign has been forced to go almost entirely virtual due to the coronavirus pandemic. The United States has by far the highest number of infections – over 26.8 lakh – and more than 1.29 lakh deaths, also the most for any country, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Raj, who was once part of former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttgieg’s presidential campaign “Pete for America”, linked her announcement to a CNN report published on June 24 about Biden’s campaign trying to ramp up its digital operations. Buttgieg was the first openly gay individual to declare his candidacy for the US presidency. However, on March 1, he dropped out of the race and endorsed Biden.

CNN reported that Raj will “work across all facets of the digital department to streamline and coordinate how to maximize the impact of its digital outputs”. Raj is a graduate in international politics from Georgetown University, and an MBA from Stanford University, according to her LinkedIn profile.

The news network also said that the Biden campaign has appointed Clarke Humphrey, who previously worked on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign, to act as deputy digital director for grassroots fundraising. Biden has also named Jose Nunez as the new digital organising director.

On June 5, Biden formally secured the Democratic presidential nomination by winning the primaries, allowing him to contest against President Donald Trump in the November election. In April, his main rival Bernie Sanders had announced he was ending his campaign to secure the nomination.



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